Things You Never Knew about The Little House on the Prairie Books

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I read “The Little House on the Prairie” books voraciously when I was a young girl. Camped out on my red patchwork bedspread in leg warmers under my Michael Jackson’s Thriller poster, I poured through the series, my eyes starved for the next fascinating anecdote about roughing it in the untamed midwest. This series of books is as much a part of my childhood as the Muppets or the Atari 2600.

So when I read this article on latimes.com, I was surprised to learn some of the interesting backstory about this important series. First of all, I was surprised to learn her daughter edited the series (or maybe wrote it, although Rose Wilder Lane said she just “edited” her mother’s work). Then I was surprised to learn the Ingalls had been in Iowa for a time. Even more surprised to hear half-pint stood up to a drunk uncle and fended off lecherous and criminal advances…I am a little thankful that part was left out of the books!

For more fascinating and eye-opening facts about The Little House series, read the article for yourself.

“The Reality Behind Laura Ingalls Wilder’s ‘Little House’ Books.

Typos Count: Catching the Errors Before You Hit Send

     Peeface

Poor, poor Peeface…

It used to be, back in the day, that Typos were a problem for writers, printed publications, and secretaries. Nowadays, in the world of social media and email, Typos are everyone’s problem.

Everything you write is about communication. When you make a thoughtless mistake, it’s distracting from what you wrote. Typos take the reader out of the experience and force them to judge you. To avoid this, you must proof—and preferably before anyone else reads it.

Art and Lit

Well, at least there aren’t many words in paintings.

A while ago, I confessed that I have a long and tortuous relationship with Typos. I implored others to help me with their tips on how to catch Typos. My readers did not disappoint. I found out some great stuff.

So in the spirit of sharing and keeping emails, resumes, business writing, and cat video explanations error-free, here are additional ways to proof better BEFORE you hit send:

Matthew Steele, this is IT:

“Another way to catch typos is to save your article in PDF format and then open it in Adobe Reader (free) and go to View > Read Out Loud > Activate Read Out Loud, then click where you want it to start reading. It’s a monotone voice, but if you can put up with it, hearing it read to you while you read is a real help.”

Monique Huenergardt, Freelance Author’s Editor, Copy Editor, and Proofreader:

“Change the font style and size, and then reread it. The “preview” function in Blogger serves the same purpose; I almost always catch errors I didn’t see in the draft.”

Writu Tandon, Business Operations Specialist Advance with State of New Mexico:

“In my case, a ‘second pair of eyes’ saves me. Whenever possible, I show my work to my coworker or a friend. Otherwise, I email it to myself, and for some unknown reason, when I receive it in my inbox, I read it more objectively and am able to find ‘most’ typos.”

John Wurtenberger, President and Business Development Engineer at WURTEK:

“One thing my mom taught me when I was a kid was to read my writing backward, word for word. This gives the eyes and brain a different perspective, allowing some misspellings and typos to jump out that we would normally miss.”

If you want a refresher in how I proof, you can hear my radio interview on proofing resumes here.

Inland Empire

So THAT’s why real estate is so much cheaper in the Inland Empire!

It’s not easy to proof your own stuff. One need only read over my past posts, to know that typos are alarmingly pervasive in today’s quick to publish genres. I would argue, however that learning from someone like me has distinct advantages, not the least of which is that I am just an ordinary sinner when it comes to proofing. Asking for proofing advice from someone who is perfect at proofing is like asking a cat how to make a video that is both cute and viral. They don’t know…so they can’t tell you. Plus in this case, cats can’t talk, which just creates more obstacles to knowledge.

Home Run Hitler

Um…Thanks, guys?

I know firsthand that this is true. When I was in college, I decided to be a music minor. My parents were overjoyed, by the way. I guess they were so glad that I had something to fall back on in case my Theatre Major didn’t pan out for me.

As an illustrious Music minor, I had to take Music Theory (business school types: this is how you write actual music on a staff for instruments and voices and stuff). Part of the class that was particularly challenging to me was called ear training, a lab portion of the class where you listen to notes and have to write them down on the staff as played.

Amercia

To be honest, it took me longer than it should to see this one!

IF the idea of this class bewilders you, then you know exactly how I felt. A professor with perfect pitch, a rare gift where the possessor knows exactly the notes and key just by hearing them, taught my first semester. Needless to say, he wasn’t much help to my complete ineptitude. He was generous, however, as he gave me a C, although I sincerely doubt I earned it.

The next semester, however, the professor who taught this portion of class had also struggled with ear training. He was a far superior teacher, because he had to teach himself. He knew how to talk to the clueless, like me, because he had also been clueless at one time.

Human Sauce

Is number 6 gluten-free?

Because of the ear training course, I am living proof that an absolute idiot can get better at almost anything. So no matter how abysmal you are at proofing your own emails (posts, marketing copy, resumes, novels, letters to your mom), you can improve. To start the process of improvement, however, you have to take the first step.

Shoplifters

Seems a little extreme…

I challenge you to try one of these methods above and let me know what you discover in what you thought was otherwise a perfectly acceptable email. Only this time, you will see the blunder before you hit send.

For many more hilarious Typo Memes, see “30 of the Funniest Typos of All Time” at weknowmems.com.

Terri Lively is a career marketing professional that has unique experience in the areas of messaging and client relations. Terri helps her clients break through the clutter by injecting a bit of humor into the business world. For the past 15 years, she helps her clients create marketing materials that effectively communicate their message and get results, across all types of media. More about Terri can be discovered at www.terrilively.com.

According to Angela Booth, You Need to Think in Scenes!

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Source: Angela Booth’s Fab Freelance Writing Blog

I love this. I found it on Pinterest, along with a fantastic board about Freelance Writing.  I followed it immediately.

Sadly, my fiction isn’t getting anywhere these days. I am happy to report it’s because I am writing a lot of non fiction (which I also enjoy!).

If you are working on your novel/screenplay/YouTube series however, I thought this might help!

Typ0s: Part Deux

I have posted about Typ0s before. Now I am talking about it on Radio Shows!

Error Free Resumes By Terri Lively and Cady Chesney

Hope this helps you catch those elusive Typ0s today.

If I Title This Link with a Question, Will More People Read My Post?

If I Title This Link with a Question, Will More People Read My Post?

One of my clients sent me this post today. It’s the same client that I just told last week that I don’t like when questions start copy. Needless to say, at least according to researchers at the BI Norwegian School, I was wrong. Apparently questions are an excellent way to start copy–if you want more people to read it. 

My aversion to questions at the beginning of copy has to do with years of writing marketing copy. Certain phrases raise my writers hackles as a result of reading thousands of words of marketing copy. Phrases like:

  • “…makes Widgets R Us you’re one-stop widget shop.”
  • For all your widget needs.

and my favorite…

  • “But wait, there’s MORE!”

I’m slightly annoyed even listing them here.

To me, it’s lazy writing to start your copy with a qualifying questions like,  “Do you have problems with your widget’s flagellating falletaboppers?” This question is trying to qualify the audience, of course, so if you do have problems with your flagellating falletaboppers you will read the rest. My problem with this technique is that it also disqualifies all the people whose falletaboppers are functioning just fine.

Now the researchers are referring to headlines, not marketing copy. Plus their questions are such that the audience is not quite as narrow as the Widget-Falletabopper crowd. So I could see times when this might work moving forward. 

What do you think about questions in marketing copy and headlines: lazy writing or a good method for attracting an audience? Do questions serve all your copywriting needs and are an essential part of your one-stop-SEO-shop? Please share your comments below.

 

But wait, there’s more…

If you hate questions as much as I do, share your favorite qualifying (and disqualifying) questions, too.